Links: porn (ch)users, Fire Phone, moody ring, and more

A selection of 7 links for you. Use them wisely.

96pc of web users ‘opt to see porn’ — Telegraph

Rhiannon Williams:

The vast majority of broadband customers are choosing not to opt in to porn filters that prevent access to adult content, despite Prime Minister David Cameron’s insistence they are vital to protect “our children and their innocence”.

Only 4% of new Virgin Media customers have signed up to the parental controls, alongside 5% of BT and 8% of Sky newcomers, according to a new report by Ofcom
.
In the second of three reports examining the approaches the ‘big four’ internet service providers (ISP) are taking to implement the filters, Ofcom found that TalkTalk’s take-up rate was 36%, having offered parental filtering services since May 2011, two years prior to the government initiative.

Filed under “government initiatives that were successful in providing a choice that people completely ignored.”


Amazon Fire Phone review — The Verge

David Pierce:

The Kindle Paperwhite is what the Fire Phone should be, a device perfectly suited to its task with subtle improvements lurking behind every corner. And who knows? Maybe in seven more years we’ll have the smartphone equivalent. But this Fire Phone is more like that first Kindle: a device with so many features, so many ideas, that it has either forgotten or ignored what it’s supposed to be for. Dynamic Perspective and Firefly are impressive technological achievements with bright futures (if by some miracle Amazon can get its developers on board), and the Fire Phone is a remarkably efficient shopping machine. But it’s not a very good smartphone.


Nod ring lets you control gadgets with a wave of the hand >> Gadget Lab — WIRED

The stainless-steel ring is packed with motion sensors, a Bluetooth 4.0 antenna, and a pair of processors. According to Nod co-founder and CEO Anush Elangovan, the ring uses a Bluetooth Low Energy connection for all its needs; early prototypes of the ring included tests for NFC and Wi-Fi Direct chips, but those were too power-hungry and big.

Because of Bluetooth 4.0’s energy-efficiency, the Nod ring is able to squeeze an entire day’s worth of battery life out of a mere 23-mAh battery–essentially a rechargeable watch battery. The ring can also connect to Wi-Fi-controlled devices by using a smartphone as a Bluetooth gateway. Nod says the ring is designed to be worn all day–you can wear it while you’re in the shower or taking a swim, just as long as you don’t go below 170 feet.

It was sounding so good until it got to the bit about “entire day”. That should not be the horizon for a wearable’s battery life.


Now you can unlock your Moto X with a digital tattoo — The Official Motorola Blog

Made of super thin, flexible materials, based on VivaLnk’s eSkinTM technology, each digital tattoo is designed to unlock your phone with just a touch of your Moto X to the tattoo, no passwords required. The nickel-sized tattoo is adhesive, lasts for five days, and is made to stay on through showering, swimming, and vigorous activities like jogging. And it’s beautiful—with a shimmering, intricate design.

It’s another step in making it easier to unlock your phone on the go and keep your personal information safe. An average user takes 2.3 seconds to unlock their phone and does this about 39 times a day—a process that some people find so inconvenient that they do not lock their phones at all. Using NFC technology, digital tattoos make it faster to safely unlock your phone anywhere without having to enter a password. 

So much more convenient than those “fingerprint” things. Those only stay all the.. oh wait.


Chrome’s been eating your laptop’s battery for years, but Google promises to fix it — PCWorld

Google is just now responding to a bug in Chrome for Windows that may have been sapping users’ batteries for years.

Chrome’s battery drain problem was brought to wider attention by Forbes contributor Ian Morris, who noticed that Chrome for Windows was using considerably more power than other browsers.

The issue, he wrote, is that Chrome doesn’t return the system’s processor to an idle state when it’s not doing anything. Instead, Chrome sets a high “system clock tick rate” of 1 millisecond, and leaves it at that rate, even if the browser’s just running the background.

By comparison, Microsoft’s Internet Explorer only ramps up the tick rate for processor-intensive tasks such as YouTube, and otherwise returns it to the default rate of 15.625 milliseconds. According to Microsoft, setting the tick rate consistently at 1 millisecond can raise power consumption by up to 25% depending on your hardware configuration.

This bug wouldn’t be too surprising if it was introduced in a recent update. But according to Morris, the first report of it popped up in 2010, and a more recent bug report in Chromium has been racking up new comments since November 2012.

World domination first, bugfixes second. Quitting Chrome is definitely an easy way to gain battery life.


Google, Roboto and Design PR — Subtraction.com

Khoi Vinh:

There’s essentially no news in this article other than, “Google has revised Roboto using some recent best practices of type design.” And yet the Mountain View company has been able to spin that non-story into a story that claims that the company is fundamentally reinventing typography. I’ve seen the same publicity gears at work again and again over the past year, whether it’s about material design, Google’s card metaphor usage, their maps redesign, or even the narrative of how the company is integrating design itself.

The idea that Google actually is fundamentally reinventing typography has been thoroughly debunked elsewhere. So it’s an effective piece of PR.


The Nokia Lumia 1020 reaches End of Life status on September 14th. — Evleaks

As in “Microsoft’s Mobile Devices division won’t be making any more”, not “the existing devices won’t be supported”. The 1020 didn’t sell – the camera is fantastic, but people who want a fantastic camera buy a DSLR. People who want a smartphone, well, for the most part they aren’t buying a Lumia if they can afford what the 1020 cost.


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